Magic Mirror, 1st Edition 18"x24" Lithograph

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Magic Mirror, 1st Edition 18"x24" Lithograph

25.00

Magic Mirror is a digital illustration that positions familiar pop-culture references within a collage of crowded symbolism. The commonplace characters,  cartoon color scheme, and dense composition are used to capture the viewer’s attention and draw focus to the illustration’s more subtle themes. 

  • Model is 6′1″ Wearing size M
  • Slim fit
  • 100% combed cotton, pre-shrunk
  • Made in Los Angeles, USA
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While there are no actual mirrors in the drawing, the numerous references to costumes, coverings and make-up, keep questions of physical projection top of mind. Peeling skin and half-baked disguises point to the transience of physical identity, and the challenging dynamics involved in ‘seeing’ and ‘being seen’.

By wearing a costume, the characters depicted in the collage validate the mechanisms of external confirmation that makes the costumes necessary. In this way, the presence of a mask reflects the importance of the mirror. The content of the drawing works to communicate this concept on a literal and figurative level, weaving together references to physical reflection with more broad allusions to reflected social identity.

Looking at Disney’s animated version of Snow White - a work which is referenced and throughout the collage - the physical mirror in the story serves as an effective device for communicating the risks of relying on external confirmation to determine a sense of self-worth. However on a higher level, the entire film can also be seen as a mirror, reflecting the realities of the society in which it was made.

Just like the mirror on the wall, the social mirror reflected in popular media like Snow White holds incredible power to shape a viewer’s sense of identity. In the same way that a physical mirror can constrain the viewer’s ability to feel young or attractive, the freedom to define a deeper psychological identity as normal and wanted is challenged by the reflected realities within popular social narratives.

The content and symbols within ‘Magic Mirror’ aim to highlight the tensions between the internal and external sense of self, exploring not only the confines of physicality, but also similar questions of identity related to gender, age, race and sexuality.